When it comes to whether or not the San Antonio Spurs should draft him, there seems to be no general consensus on Franz Wagner. In an age in the NBA when three-level shot creation or otherwordly athleticism seems to reign supreme, Wagner is neither.

Interestingly enough, though, Franz will find himself making plays for his future team, despite his athletic limitations and limited dribble combinations.

He isn't the quickest or bounciest athlete, doesn't provide much in the way of ball-handling, let alone hesi-moves or blow-bys, and he rarely dumps the ball off to his big in the dunker spot. Rather, his game revolves around one thing: craftiness.

As an extremely polished and gifted passer, high IQ defender, and technically sound player across the board, Wagner's playmaking ability and overall usage of his skillset is remarkable. Interchangeable at either forward spot, he could turn out to be a great chess piece for the modern NBA team.

San Antonio will surely need to improve their frontcourt situation in the near future. As an already guard-heavy team, they shouldn't be interested in selecting another backcourt piece unless the entire NBA forgets either Jalen Green or Suggs are available. Guys like Franz Wagner, Kai Jones, Usman Garuba and others in that hybrid forward/center, modern NBA big role should be on their radar.

Thus, Wagner fills a position of need and adds a skillset and dynamic that Spurs fans like Trevor Zickgraf find to be reminiscent of one Boris Diaw, for good reason. While he would be far from being the flashiest player on the team, particularly next to guys like Lonnie Walker and Keldon Johnson, he could be the proverbial "glue" that holds a raw, athletic team together. Surely, he'd be a piece that coach Gregg Popovich would use interestingly in the future.